Skip to Navigation
Skip to Content
Share this page

Support PSR!

Your membership supports PSR's work to reduce global warming, eliminate toxics in our environment and abolish nuclear weapons. YOU make our work possible. Thank you.

Donate Now »

Take Action

Lives are at stake when funding for the EPA is up for debate.

Symposium Geared Toward Health Professionals Focuses on Climate Change and the Growing Risk of Nuclear War

Posted by Anna Baker, Climate for Health on September 29, 2016

Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR), one of Climate for Health's partners, has been working for more than 50 years to create a healthy, just and peaceful world for both present and future generations. PSR addresses dangers that threaten communities by using their medical and public health expertise to prevent nuclear war and proliferation, reverse our trajectory towards climate change, protect the public and our environment from toxic chemicals, and eliminate the use of nuclear power.

Dr. Catherine Thomasson, Executive Director of Physicians for Social Responsibility, is a member of Climate for Health’s leadership circle, and will be one of the panelists at the symposium.


On October 15, 2016, the Tufts University School of Medicine will host a one-day symposium, Climate Change and the Growing Risk of Nuclear War: A Health Care Perspective, to examine the catastrophic public health consequences of climate change and the ways that climate change will increase the risk of conflict, including nuclear war.  The conference is convened by the Greater Boston chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility, and sponsored by the Massachusetts Medical Society in addition to a majority of the schools of medicine, public health and nursing in the Boston area.

The day will begin with a panel focused on climate change’s impact on public health, followed by a discussion about the increased potential for nuclear conflict. After lunch there will be a panel focused on current international efforts to prevent climate change and nuclear war, and a series of collaborative, action-focused workshops designed for health professionals and students. Panelists will include a distinguished set of professionals, including Bill McKibben, Dr. Ira Helfand, Dr. Barry Levy, Dr. Jennifer Leaning, and Dr. Catherine Thomasson amongst others. Click here to see the full program and list of speakers.

After attending the symposium, attendees will be able to:

  • identify ways in which climate change can lead to conflict and violence.
  • describe the climate disruption that would follow nuclear war.
  • list strategies individuals can take to help prevent the health and societal effects of climate change
  • describe what individuals can do to reduce the nuclear threat.
  • identify the health consequences of climate change and nuclear war.
  • apply scientific expertise to informing policy-makers about the implications of climate change and nuclear war.

The workshops will provide ample time for discussion and questions.

Can't attend the symposium in person? The event will be livestreamed on YouTube for those who can't make it: youtube.com/psrnational/live

Read more about radiation and health and the climate and health effects of regional nuclear war, and access resources regarding the myths of nuclear power and safer uses of energy here.

Symposium Details

Date: Saturday, October 15, 2016, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Location: Tufts University School of Medicine, Sackler Auditorium, Boston

Register here: http://www.psr.org/symposium

Sponsors:

BIDMC Fellowship in Disaster Medicine
Boston University Medical School
Boston University School of Public Health
Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University
Greater Boston Physicians for Social Responsibility
Harvard Medical School
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Massachusetts Medical Society
Massachusetts Public Health Association
Tufts University School of Medicine
University of Massachusetts Boston, School of Nursing and Health Science

Cross-posted from the Climate for Health blog.

Comments

Comments closed.