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Our nation's clean water policy should provide all communities with access to healthy, safe water by protecting the streams and wetlands that contribute to our drinking water supply.

Ask Trader Joe's To Be a Leader In Using Antibiotics Responsibly

January 28, 2014 - February 1, 2014
Portland, Oregon

Few people know better than those on the front lines of medicine how critical antibiotics are to successfully treating patients, and how quickly the power of these drugs is disappearing. But while health professionals work to rein in the overuse of antibiotics in humans, antibiotic overuse in the production of food animals is rampant to promote growth and prevent illness in cramped, unsanitary living conditions.

80% of the antibiotics sold in this country are used in animal agriculture, often for non-therapeutic purposes, as growth promoters and to compensate for unsanitary living conditions. Many of these antibiotics are also medically important (like penicillin and macrolides), and used to treat illnesses in humans.

Antibiotic use in animal agriculture is a public health threat, leading to the evolution of superbugs and diseases that are becoming costly to treat and more likely to cause death. Retail meat that has been tested by independent researchers has been found to be contaminated with strains of E. coli and salmonella that are multi-drug resistant, a public safety concern.

As one of the largest grocery retailers in the U.S., Trader Joe's should take a stand for public health and end their sale of meat from animals routinely raised on antibiotics. Trader Joe’s leadership could have a big impact on meat industry practices.

Please help us in asking Trader Joe’s to end the sale of meat from livestock producers that routinely and inappropriately administer these drugs to their animals by signing this letter today.

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