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Encourage Senator Wyden to Support the Safe Chemicals Act of 2011

April 14, 2012

Dear Oregon PSR Supporter:

If you are a health care professional, please sign on to this letter urging Oregon Senator Ron Wyden to support the Safe Chemicals Act of 2011. The Safe Chemicals Act of 2011 would, for the first time, require the chemical industry to ensure that chemicals are safe before they end up in our homes, schools, and places of work. Introduced by Senator Frank Lautenburg (D-NJ) and cosponsored by Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley, this is an important piece of legislation that would better protect our families and communities from the numerous, serious health threats posed by the poorly regulated chemical industry. We commend Senator Merkley for co-sponsoring this legislation, and urge Senator Wyden to join him.

Read the full text of the sign-on letter.

Chemicals in commerce are currently regulated by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), a statute that has not had a major overhaul since it passed in 1976. TSCA is ineffective, allowing chemicals to enter the market without adequate safety testing. Americans are then exposed to chemicals through consumer products, air, water, soil, and food. 

There are health implications to these exposures. Evidence indicates that industrial chemicals increase the risk of health problems ranging from asthma and infertility to heart disease, obesity, birth defects, neurodevelopmental effects in children, and cancer. Estimates of the proportion of the disease burden that can be attributed to chemicals vary widely; whatever the actual contribution, effective chemical policy reform will incorporate the last 30 years of science to reduce the chemical exposures that contribute to the rising incidence of chronic disease.

Please sign on to the letter and lend your voice as a health professional in support of a safer chemicals policy. Thank you!

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