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The Old and New Faces of Nuclear Weapons

August 6, 2014 - August 6, 2014
Portland, Oregon

Our sincere appreciation to everyone who supported and attended our 2014 commemoration of the 69th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6th. We had a great turnout for this year's event, and we were very pleased to see so many people gathered together to commemorate the tragic loss of human life to nuclear weapons and to learn more about, and get involved with, efforts to abolish these weapons. 

The theme for this year’s event was The Old and New Faces of Nuclear Weapons. We chose this to emphasize how nuclear weapons have evolved over time from their tragic use at Hiroshima and Nagasaki to the uranium munitions used in modern warfare and ever more dangerous weapons currently being developed. We asked our audience to sign the petition in support of the Marshall Island's lawsuit against the 9 nuclear-armed nations for failing to comply with nuclear non-proliferation treaties, thereby adding more than a hundred new names in support of this effort.

Our speakers included Congressman Earl Blumenauer, who has sponsored new legislation to cut funding for nuclear weapons, and retired Army Colonel Ann Wright, who famously resigned her State Department position in protest of the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Congressman Blumenauer discussed the need for political action to cut spending on nuclear weapons and their delivery systems, highlighting the billions of dollars that could otherwise be spent on improving the lives and the health of our citizens. Ann Wright spoke on the folly of nuclear weapons, included uranium munitions, and on the importance of citizen activism in ensuring a healthier, nuclear-free future.

Our emcee, Chisao Hata, did a fantastic job, and we had a tremendously entertaining musical performance by en Taiko, a group of young taiko performers whose energy and enthusiasm proved contagious. This year's commemoration also featured an interactive art project by Anna Daedalus and Kerry Davis entitled River Shadow Scroll, in which a scroll of fabric imprinted with images of Hanford and the Columbia River was moved through the assembled audience, its serpentine motion symbolizing the motion of this is life-giving river.

Thanks again to all of our supporters, who make this annual commemoration possible, and to all of our speakers, performers, attendees, planning committee members and co-sponsoring organizations. We hope that you will join us again next year in commemorating the 70th anniversary of the bombings. To get involved in these efforts, please contact us at 503-274-2720. Thank you!

Visit our Facebook page for photos from the event, and visit our YouTube page for video (coming soon).

Resources

  • Nuclear Famine: A Billion People at Risk Report

    Newly generated data on the decline in agricultural production that would follow a limited, regional nuclear war in South Asia support the concern that more than one billion people would be in danger of starvation. Epidemic disease and further conflict spawned by such a famine would put additional hundreds of millions at risk. Read more »

  • Don't Bank on the Bomb Report

    Don’t Bank on the Bomb is the first major global report on the financing of companies that manufacture, modernize and maintain nuclear weapons and their delivery vehicles. It identifies more than 300 banks, insurance companies, pension funds and asset managers from 30 countries that invest significantly in 20 major nuclear weapons producers. Read more »