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Heat Advisory: Protecting Health on a Warming Planet
by Dr. Alan Lockwood

Drawing on peer-reviewed scientific and medical research, Dr. Lockwood meticulously details the symptoms of climate change and their medical side effects.

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Prevention + Health = Real Chemical Policy Reform

kids playing, childrenThe U.S. desperately needs a modern chemical policy that reduces health hazards and risks. Our country lags far behind most developed nations because it allows use of hazardous and untested chemicals in consumer products and other materials.

It has been 37 years since Congress passed the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) which was intended to ensure the safety of industrial chemicals. Since TSCA’s passage, rates of serious diseases linked to chemical exposures – like childhood cancer, breast cancer, asthma, autism, infertility, birth defects, learning disabilities and other health conditions — have increased, not decreased as one might expect if the law were in fact health-protective.  

If the U.S. is to improve health nationally, it must address environmental factors by preventing exposures to hazardous substances such as persistent, bio-accumulative, or toxic chemicals.

Unfortunately, the new 2015 TSCA reform proposal as introduced by Senator Vitter falls short, both in protecting health and moving us to safer chemicals and consumer products. It instead weighs industry’s interests over the public’s health.

Real Health Protective Chemical Policy Reform will:

  • Require that chemicals be shown safe to remain in use, rather than require they be shown harmful to be removed from use.
  • Establish clear protections for children, pregnant women, workers, and hotspot communities heavily affected by pollution and toxic chemicals.
  • Preserve states' rights to regulate chemicals and to be more protective than federal standards.
  • Empower the EPA to move quickly on the worst chemicals, including bans and phase outs if necessary.
  • Utilize the best available science to assess chemical hazards.
  • Allow public access to chemical hazard information and data as a means to support innovation in the development of products that are safer and greener.
  • Incentivize industry to design hazards out of products in the first place.
Page Updated April 9, 2015

Resources

  • PSR Expert Testimony on Coal Ash

    Chesapeake PSR is suing the EPA over a proposed delay in a rule that slashes coal ash waste discharges into rivers and streams. PSR National Environment & Health Director Barbara Gottlieb gave expert testimony on the health impacts of coal ash disposal. Read more »

  • Pediatric Environmental Health Toolkit

    PSR and the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units have just introduced the updated Pediatric Environmental Health Toolkit (PEHT). This free web app offers evidenced-based information for clinicians to educate parents about how to reduce toxic exposures during well-child visits. Read more »

  • Environmental Health

    This introductory course in Environmental Health is intended for undergraduate- and graduate-level students of medicine, environmental sciences or public health, and provides foundational theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. Free course offered by NextGenU. Read more »

In the Spotlight

  • November 5, 2017
    APHA 2017 Health Activist Dinner
    The Health Activist Dinner at American Public Health Association's annual meeting will include the presentation of the Edward Barsky Award to PSR's Dr. Ira Helfand.