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About

Welcome to PSR's Environmental Health Policy Institute, where we ask questions -- then we ask the experts to answer them. Join us as physicians, health professionals, and environmental health experts share their ideas, inspiration, and analysis about toxic chemicals and environmental health policy.

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  • PSR's Final Environmental Health Policy Institute
    Posted by Barbara Gottlieb

    It’s with some sadness that I announce that this is PSR’s final Environmental Health Policy Institute.

    PSR introduced the Institute on September 1, 2010.  Since that time, over four-plus years, PSR has posed significant questions in the field of toxic chemicals and environmental health policy, and invited physicians, other health professionals and environmental health experts to share their thoughtful answers.

    The scope of the Institute has been broad.  Topics ranged from emerging hazardous environmental threats to particular classes of chemicals and their particular effects, including brain development, obesity and childhood cancer.  We looked at the people who were harmed, especially at-risk populations such as children, pregnant women, farmworkers and environmental justice communities.  We also explored the realms that were contaminated with environmental toxics, from food, to the air around us, to toxics in fragrances.  And we examined policy issues in the field of chemicals management at both the federal and the state levels, probing current policy and the future of toxics advocacy.  We also scrutinized the roles of institutional players in policy development, from the Environmental Protection Agency to scientists whose paychecks are signed by industry.

    Finally, besides looking at chemicals in products, we expanded the vision of environmental chemicals to encompass the toxic implications of broader environmental issues.  The Institute addressed issues including climate change, hydraulic fracturing, and the toxic wastes from the coal combustion.

    Now, in our final Institute, we look at issues likely to be on the future agenda of health professionals and others working diligently to protect our communities and our children from unnecessary, unwarranted exposure to toxic chemicals.   This month’s selection encompasses nanosubstances, neonicotinoid pesticides, the environmental justice aspects of climate change, and federal toxics policy.

    To all of you – readers, authors, funders and colleagues – thanks for your support over the years.  I look forward to working with you as we continue to educate and advocate on behalf of a clean and healthy world.

    Responses

    Will the New Congress Protect Us from Toxic Chemicals?
    Kathy Attar, MPH




    IARC's Review of Carbon Nanotubes: Substantiating Early Warnings of Harm
    Molly Jacobs, MPH, Michael Ellenbecker, ScD, Joel Tickner, ScD, and Polly Hoppin, ScD


    The Recurring Silent Spring
    Chensheng (Alex) Lu, PhD MS




    Facing an Unpredictable Future: Climate Resiliency and Environmental Justice
    Cecilia Martinez, PhD, and Nicky Sheats, PhD



    The views expressed in these essays are those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Physicians for Social Responsibility.