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About

Welcome to PSR's Environmental Health Policy Institute, where we ask questions -- then we ask the experts to answer them. Join us as physicians, health professionals, and environmental health experts share their ideas, inspiration, and analysis about toxic chemicals and environmental health policy.

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Anneclaire De Roos, PhD, MPH

Dr. Anneclaire J. De Roos is Associate Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health in the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  She earned a bachelor of arts degree (geography/ecosystems) from the University of California at Los Angeles, a master of public health (MPH) degree (epidemiology/biostatistics) from the University of California at Berkeley, and a PhD (epidemiology) in the year 2000 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Her research interests and experience are primarily in the study of occupational and environmental exposures to chemicals and radiation as risk factors for cancer, autoimmune diseases, and intermediate biologic effects.  Dr. De Roos’ dissertation research focused on parental occupational exposures as risk factors for childhood cancer in their offspring.  In her current position at Drexel, Dr. De Roos teaches a course on environmental risk assessment.  She continues her research in environmental risk factors for disease, including workplace exposures (pesticides, solvents), persistent organic pollutants (PCBs, dioxins), and point sources of pollution (industrial facilities, traffic).  Dr. De Roos has served on several expert committees in recent years, including those reviewing formaldehyde for NIEHS’s Report on Carcinogens and the trichloroethylene (TCE) health assessment document for the Environmental Protection Agency.

Posts

PCBs: Cancer Linkage Found Decades after a Ban, June 24, 2014