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Welcome to PSR's Environmental Health Policy Institute, where we ask questions -- then we ask the experts to answer them. Join us as physicians, health professionals, and environmental health experts share their ideas, inspiration, and analysis about toxic chemicals and environmental health policy.

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Male Infertility: Environmental Causes and the Need for Prevention

Posted by Kathy Attar


Society often views fertility as a women’s issue despite the fact that 50% of infertility cases result from the male partner’s condition.  Male infertility is complex and can occur because of environmental, lifestyle, endocrine (hormonal), or physical problems. Environmental factors may include exposure to hazardous chemicals in the workplace, home or community.

This month’s Environmental Health Policy Institute reviews the research on how the environment, particularly toxic chemicals, can wreak havoc on a male’s reproductive system. For example, research continues to demonstrate that exposure to chemicals in everyday products-like plastics can reduce semen quality and lead to low sperm counts, male infertility, hormonal changes, and testicular and prostate cancer. Pesticides are an example of toxic chemicals whose destructive power can affect targets well beyond their intended ones, damaging sperm and disrupting endocrine function. Read more about male infertility and its environmental causes and the need for real reform of our chemicals policy in our latest Environmental Health Policy Institute.

Responses

Conceiving of a Healthier Future: Toxics, Pregnancy and Male Fertility Outcomes
Sara Alcid
BPA and Semen Quality
Shelley Ehrlich MD, ScD, MPH
Pesticides & Male Infertility: Harm from the Womb through Adulthood -- and into the Next Generation
Kristin Schafer
The views expressed in these essays are those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Physicians for Social Responsibility.

Comments

Diane H said ..

Why not consider the role of wireless radiation in male and female infertility? Estimates are that in two generations that sterility will have resulted from the radiation emissions.

March 17, 2014
Carl said ..

In Oklahoma when "the wind comes sweeping down the plains" it is often laden with chemicals.

March 2, 2014
faith Daisy T said ..

Yes to the ladies , let's have men get to know that most times they are the problem not vise versa!

February 28, 2014
Peter Haroutian said ..

I would think that it would be a good idea to stay away from chemicals for any reason !

February 27, 2014

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