Skip to Navigation
Skip to Content

Support PSR!

Make a difference in the challenge to confront global warming and prevent nuclear war and the development and use of nuclear weapons.

Donate Now »

Take Action

Please voice your support for a strong, health-protective rule by submitting your comment to the EPA today.

Global Climate Change and Health: Best Practices for Mitigating the Effects and Impacting Policy

February 22, 2012
Orlando, Florida

A free conference from the American College of Preventive Medicine featuring PSR board members Drs. Cindy Parker and Lynn Ringenberg.

Time: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Eastern
Location: Buena Vista Palace Hotel and Spa

The conference will enable preventive medicine physicians and other healthcare providers to come together to hear about the issues facing local and national leaders and to make a commitment to mobilize and actively participate in advocacy efforts targeting global climate change in their communities. This conference will include interactive working group sessions to develop communication messages and concrete plans for each participant to take back to their own community and work setting. The conference is free but you must register. See below for details.*

Featured speakers include:

  • Cindy Parker, MD, MPH, ACPM Environmental Health Committee Chair and Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Environment, Energy, Sustainability, and Health Institute;
  • George Luber, MA, PhD, Associate Director for Climate Change of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention;
  • Edward Maibach, MPH, PhD, Director of the Center for Climate Change Communication Distinguished University Professor, Department of Communication George Mason University; and 
  • A panel of experts to discuss greening your practice, tools and resources, and science-based advocacy

*This conference is free to attend and will be held in the same location as ACPM's Preventive Medicine 2012 annual meeting, however, registration for this conference is independent of that meeting and not part of the Preventive Medicine 2012 annual meeting registration or institute package rate. You MUST register for this conference separately.

All ACPM members will be able to receive continuing medical education (CME) and maintenance of certification (MOC) credit free of charge for this event. Non-members desiring CME or MOC credits pay only $10 per credit ($15 for 1.5 credits) for CME and $10 per credit for MOC.  Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by the CDC. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

More information »

Action Alerts

More action alerts»

Resources

  • Annual Report 2012

    PSR is pleased to present its 2012 Annual Report to our members and other stakeholders. Read more »

  • Toxic Chemicals in Our Food System

    What chemicals are in the food we eat? Chemicals are used in every step of the process that puts food on our table: production, harvesting, processing, packing, transport, marketing and consumption and can be dangerous to our health. Read more »

  • Fracking: Harm on the Farm

    Chemical exposures that harm farm animals and wild animals raise concern about health risks for people living near fracking sites, as the animals use the same water and breathe the same air as humans. Another, indirect concern for human health also exists: in multiple known cases of chemical exposure, cows continued to produce dairy and meat for human consumption, although it remained untested for chemical contaminants. Read more »

In the Spotlight

  • July 17, 2014
    Our Best Opportunity to Cut Climate Change
    We need you to take action now! Tell the EPA that its proposed rule to cut carbon pollution from power plants Is vitally important and on the right track – but can be strengthened.