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Webinar: The A to Z on Atrazine: Sex Hormones and America's Most Popular Pesticide

January 15, 2013

Time: 3:00 pm EST/Noon PST

Despite being banned in Europe due to health risks, atrazine, a hormone-disrupting herbicide, is one of the world's most largely used pesticides -- hundreds of millions of pounds per year.  It can be found in our lakes, streams, rain, and drinking water, at levels that make a difference to human health.  Scientists link exposure to increased risk of birth defects, infertility and cancer, among other health impacts.  It turns tadpoles into hermaphrodites.

Indiana neonatologist Dr. Paul Winchester will discuss the science on atrazine exposure and birth defects in particular.  Biologist Emily Marquez, PhD, discusses how communities are monitoring drinking water supplies for atrazine, and are pushing for health protections.  She manages the Grassroots Science Program at Pesticide Action Network.  Finally, we will discuss why this chemical remains on the market in the U.S. and dialogue about roles that health professionals can take in changing our pesticides and chemicals policies.  

Co-sponsors: Pesticide Action Network, North America; The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists District IX; Physicians for Social Responsibility Los Angeles (PSRLA); Physicians for Social Responsibility San Francisco Bay Area (PSR); Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, University of California, San Francisco

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