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News

  • December 7, 2009
    US Dept of Energy Says 'No' to Jamestown, NY's Dirty Coal Proposal

    Dr. Alan Lockwood, a PSR board member, applauds the Department of Energy's decision not to fund a proposed coal plant in Jamestown, New York.

    Source: Environmental Advocates of New York
  • December 3, 2009
    2 More Utilities Retiring Aging Coal Plants in Wake of Health Report

    It's the right move for health reasons, too, as Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) found when it took an in-depth look at coal's impacts on human health and mortality. In a report released last month, the medical and public health group connected coal and its emissions to a number of serious health issues, including increased risk of heart disease, cancer, asthma and lowered IQ’s.

    Source: SolveClimate.com
  • November 30, 2009
    Prologue to Copenhagen: Fasts, Lock Downs, Sit-Ins, Die-Ins for Climate Justice Across the Nation

    On the 10th anniversary of the Seattle globalization protests, today's actions also took place on the heels of a new study by the Physicians for Social Responsibility that coal "contributes to four of the top five causes of mortality in the U.S. and is responsible for increasing the incidence of major diseases already affecting large portions of the U.S. population."

    Source: Huffington Post
  • November 27, 2009
    Medical Group Denounces Coal in Critical Report

    So you thought smoking cigarettes was bad for your health? Try living next to a coal-fired power plant. That’s the diagnosis Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) relayed to the public in a comprehensive medical study released on November 18, called Coal’s Assault on Human Health. In it, the organization, comprised of physicians and public health experts, claims that coal pollutants damage every major organ in the human body and contributes to four of the top five leading causes of death in the United States.

    Source: Online Journal
  • November 24, 2009
    EPA proposes sulfur dioxide limits for first time since 1971

    Dr. Alan Lockwood, the lead author of PSR's new report "Coal's Assault on Human Health", discusses the health impacts of coal pollution.

    Source: McClatchy
  • November 24, 2009
    State home to some of oldest coal-fired power plants in U.S.

    Physicians for Social Responsibility is another group calling for tougher regulations on existing coal-fired power plants, said Dr. Maureen McCue of Iowa City, who is active with that group. “The health impacts of coal are direct, measurable, serious and significant,” she said.

    Source: Globe Gazette (Iowa)
  • November 24, 2009
    New Report Measures the Human Costs of Coal

    Global warming may not be the only good reason to get away from burning coal for energy generation. According to a new report from Physicians for Social Responsibility, coal has deadly effects on human health. By studying the impact of coal pollution on major human organ systems, researchers concluded that the energy source contributes to four of the nation's top five causes of death.

    Source: Public News Service
  • November 23, 2009
    Toward a medically defensible energy policy

    An article discussing PSR's recent report on the dangers of coal, Coal's Assault on Human Health.

    Source: Grist
  • November 23, 2009
    Challenging the Second Wave of the Texas Coal Rush

    Pediatrician and PSR member Dr. Karen Lewis discusses the health dangers of new coal plants.

    Source: BurntOrangeReport.com (Texas)
  • November 19, 2009
    Interview: Doctors Call For Cleaner Coal (Audio)

    A group of doctors, Physicians for Social Responsibility, has issued a new report called "Coal's Assault On Human Health." It explains the health impacts of burning coal, but it goes beyond that. Lester Graham caught up with the principle author of the report - Dr. Alan Lockwood. Lockwood is a professor of neurology and nuclear medicine at the University of Buffalo. He says their report also looked at the possible health effects of climate change.

    Source: The Environment Report
  • November 18, 2009
    Report details 'coal's assault on human health'

    Coal pollution is assaulting human health through impacts on workers, residents near mining operations and power plants, and the environment in coalfield communities, according to a new report by a group of physicians.

    Source: Charleston Gazette (West Virginia)
  • November 18, 2009
    Coal Pollution Damages Human Health at Every Stage of Coal Life Cycle, Reports Physicians for Social Responsibility

    Physicians for Social Responsibility today released a groundbreaking medical report, “Coal’s Assault on Human Health,” which takes a new look at the devastating impacts of coal on the human body. By examining the impact of coal pollution on the major organ systems of the human body, the report concludes that coal contributes to four of the top five causes of mortality in the U.S. and is responsible for increasing the incidence of major diseases already affecting large portions of the U.S. population.

  • November 18, 2009
    Coal Pollution Undermines America's Health, Physicians Advise

    Coal pollutants affect all major body organ systems and contribute to four of the five leading causes of mortality in the United States: heart disease, cancer, stroke, and chronic lower respiratory diseases, concludes a scathing report issued today by Physicians for Social Responsibility.

    Source: Environment News Service
  • October 14, 2009
    Duke Power Co rate increase

    Western North Carolina PSR President Dr. Lew Patrie and PSR member Dr. Richard Fireman are quoted on the health impacts of coal-fired power plants.

    Source: McDowell News (North Carolina)
  • October 1, 2009
    US Senate Introduces Long-Awaited Climate Bill

    Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) applauds Senators Kerry and Boxer for introducing the Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act.

  • September 23, 2009
    PSR defends EPA authority

    PSR is working intensively to assure that the EPA’s power to regulate emissions of carbon dioxide from the biggest polluters is not stripped away.

  • September 10, 2009
    Wash. says deal will cut pollution at coal plant

    Cherie Eicholz, Executive Director of Washington PSR, discusses the health impacts of coal pollution.

    Source: CNBC
  • August 31, 2009
    PSR Launches Campaign to Support Strong Climate and Energy Legislation

    The Senate will soon be considering climate change and energy legislation. We need your help at this critical time to speak in support of strong legislation that confronts the growing threat from climate change while leading the U.S. towards a healthy, peaceful and sustainable future.

  • August 17, 2009
    The Clunkers of the Power-Plant World

    Many public health and environmental advocates say too little attention has been paid to facilities such as Fisk and Crawford -- "legacy" plants grandfathered in under the 1977 Clean Air Act and largely exempted from its requirement that facilities use the best pollution-control technology.

    Source: Washington Post
  • July 2, 2009
    House Passage of the American Clean Energy and Security Act is an Historic Milestone; Stronger Action is Essential

    PSR recognizes the historic significance of House passage on June 26, 2009, of the American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACES). For the first time, a branch of Congress has taken responsibility for acting to comprehensively reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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In the Spotlight

  • July 17, 2014
    Our Best Opportunity to Cut Climate Change
    We need you to take action now! Tell the EPA that its proposed rule to cut carbon pollution from power plants Is vitally important and on the right track – but can be strengthened.