Skip to Navigation
Skip to Content

Support PSR!

Make a difference in the challenge to confront global warming and prevent nuclear war and the development and use of nuclear weapons.

Donate Now »

Take Action

Celebrate Nuclear Abolition Day by contacting Secretary of State John Kerry.

News

  • November 18, 2010
    Coal ash: Truly hazardous

    PSR national board member and Washington PSR President Steven Gilbert, PhD, DABT, explains the dangerous health effects of hazardous coal ash waste and urges the EPA to enact strong regulations on coal ash disposal.

    Source: The Salt Lake Tribune
  • November 18, 2010
    PSR Testifies for Health-protective Coal Ash Disposal

    Seizing an opportunity to shape a policy with nationwide implications for health, PSR mobilized its network to urge the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to adopt strong, health-protective regulations for the disposal of coal ash.

  • October 29, 2010
    Coal starts dirty and ends dirty

    A recent report by the group Physicians for Social Responsibility titled "Coal Ash -- The toxic threat to our health and environment" provides an overview of the specific dangers linked with coal ash and the scale of the problem in the United States.

    Source: Las Vegas Review-Journal
  • October 27, 2010
    PSR brings health concerns to the fore as EPA hearings scrutinize coal ash

    PSR chapters, board members and staff have been raising concerns nationwide about the health impacts of coal ash disposal. Barbara Gottlieb was interviewed on the Knoxville, TN NPR station the morning of the final EPA public hearing on coal ash regulation.

    Source: WUOT
  • October 27, 2010
    Koch Leaves Federal Cancer Panel as Groups Urge Ethics Probe

    Energy magnate David Koch ceded his spot on a National Cancer Institute advisory board last month, but green advocates including PSR are taking aim at the conservative mega-donor nonetheless by calling for a review of federal ethics policies that allowed him to sit on the panel despite a potential conflict of interest.

    Source: New York Times
  • October 15, 2010
    PSR Meets with EPA on Coal Ash

    PSR met recently with the Environmental Protection Agency to present our new report on coal ash and health and to voice support for strong, health-protective regulation of coal ash disposal. Our presentation focused on concerns that highlight the need for robust regulation at the federal level – including, in some cases, steps that go beyond the EPA’s current proposal.

  • October 13, 2010
    Protestors rally to shut down Chicago's coal plants

    Pilsen’s air is dirty. While hundreds of runners gasped for it, passing the Chicago Marathon’s 20-mile marker Sunday, just blocks away dozens were rallying to keep it clean.

    Source: Medill Reports: Chicago
  • September 29, 2010
    Clean energy groups protest Centralia TransAlta coal plant

    Dr. Steven Gilbert, president of Washington PSR, discusses the health care costs of coal plants.

    Source: The Olympian
  • September 29, 2010
    PSR Launches Environmental Health Policy Institute

    The Environmental Health Policy Institute aims to host inspired conversation about toxic chemicals as well as cross-cutting issues in environmental health science and policy. WPSR President Steven Gilbert, PhD, DABT, is one of the first contributors!

  • September 28, 2010
    Washingtonians Demand ‘Coal to Green by 2015’

    Dr. Steven Gilbert, president of Washington PSR, explains the health impacts of coal plants.

    Source: CommonDreams.org
  • September 28, 2010
    UPDATE: Federal Chemical Reform and What YOU Can Do

    On September 13th, over 20 health professionals attended a WPSR training concerning toxic chemicals. While a significant amount of time was dedicated to presenting information about the science of chemicals, the majority of the training was focused on how health professionals can get involved and use their voice to impact both patients and colleagues, as well as policymakers and future generations.

  • September 27, 2010
    Activists Speak Out at EPA Coal Ash Hearing

    PSR's Barbara Gottlieb discusses the need for coal ash regulation in this article on an EPA coal ash hearing in Kentucky.

    Source: WFPL News
  • September 27, 2010
    Hundreds to Rally at EPA Hearing on Coal Ash in Louisville

    Barbara Gottlieb, deputy director of the Environmental Health Program for Physicians for Social Responsibility, says coal ash contains 19 harmful heavy metals, including arsenic, lead and mercury. "And these substances, if they're eaten or drunk or inhaled, can cause cancer. They can cause nervous system impacts such as cognitive deficits and developmental delays. They affect virtually every major organ system in the human body."

    Source: Public News Service
  • September 26, 2010
    For children's sake, move away from coal

    According to “Coal’s Assault on Human Health,” a report by Physicians for Social Responsibility, coal pollutants have been linked to four of the five leading causes of death in our nation, including cancer, stroke, heart disease and chronic lower respiratory diseases.

    Source: News Tribune
  • September 17, 2010
    Hundreds of concerned citizens demand EPA protections from toxic coal ash

    Hundreds of concerned citizens gathered in Chicago today urging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to pass strong, federally-enforceable safeguards for coal ash, the toxic remains left over from coal-fired power plants. Citizens traveled to Chicago from across Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan and Indiana to testify about the harmful effects of coal ash on their health, neighborhoods and communities. The hearing is one of seven the EPA is holding this month on its proposal to finally regulate toxic coal ash.

    Source: WisPolitics.com
  • September 17, 2010
    Coal ash disposal in Kansas City region

    Yesterday Earthjustice and Physicians for Social Responsibility released a detailed report entitled Coal Ash: The Toxic Threat to Our Health and Environment. The Kansas City region has some seven or eight coal ash disposal sites. Coal ash is toxic.

  • September 17, 2010
    Doctors, environmentalists urge coal waste regulation

    An organization of doctors joined an environmental group Thursday to encourage the EPA to adopt tougher regulations for coal ash waste, which they say is toxic. The 1.2 billion-gallon spill of wet coal ash from a breached dam near Kingston, Tenn., just before Christmas 2008 received national attention, but it didn't reveal the full dimensions of the health threats from coal ash waste, according to Dr. Peter Wilk, executive director of Physicians for Social Responsibility.

    Source: Electric Light & Power
  • September 16, 2010
    Groups Gauge Coal Ash Threat to Human Health

    An organization of doctors and other health professionals joined with environmentalists to release a report today detailing concerns that the leakage of toxic substances including arsenic from coal ash ponds and landfills is contaminating underground aquifers and drinking water supplies and endangering human health across the country.

  • September 16, 2010
    Groups Gauge Coal Ash Threat to Human Health

    An organization of doctors and other health professionals joined with environmentalists to release a report today detailing concerns that the leakage of toxic substances including arsenic from coal ash ponds and landfills is contaminating underground aquifers and drinking water supplies and endangering human health across the country.

  • September 13, 2010
    In Celebrating Clean Air Act’s 40th Anniversary, Senators Urged to Protect Landmark Clean Air Law

    This week, Environment America and PSR are celebrating the Clean Air Act’s 40 years of success in protecting public health and cleaning up the environment.

Items 261 - 280 of 462  Previous11121314151617181920Next

In the Spotlight

  • July 17, 2014
    Our Best Opportunity to Cut Climate Change
    We need you to take action now! Tell the EPA that its proposed rule to cut carbon pollution from power plants Is vitally important and on the right track – but can be strengthened.