Skip to Navigation
Skip to Content
Share this page

Support PSR!

Your membership supports PSR's work to reduce global warming, eliminate toxics in our environment and abolish nuclear weapons. YOU make our work possible. Thank you.

Donate Now »

Take Action

Tell the Trump Administration: Protect us from methane and toxic gas leaks from fracked-gas wells on federal lands!

Press Room

Contact PSR

Jeff Carter, JD Profile
Executive Director
202.587.5240
jcarter@psr.org

Barbara Gottlieb Profile
Director, Environment and Health
202.587.5225
301.593.6140 (after hours)
bgottlieb@psr.org

Martin Fleck Profile
Director, Security
202.587.5242
mfleck@psr.org

PSR Staff and Experts

Resources

Mission Statement

Guided by the values and expertise of medicine and public health, Physicians for Social Responsibility works to protect human life from the gravest threats to health and survival. PSR is the medical and public health voice working to prevent the use or spread of nuclear weapons and to slow, stop and reverse global warming and toxic degradation of the environment.

Full Organization Profile »


Recent Press Releases (RSS Feed)

Press Release Archive »


Press Clippings

  • April 22, 2018
    End Plastics Pollution at the Source

    More than 1200 peer-reviewed studies make the case for a ban on fracking. Concerned Health Professionals of New York and Physicians for Social Responsibility recently released the 5th edition of their Compendium of Scientific, Medical, and Media Findings Demonstrating Risks and Harms of Fracking that summarizes the studies.

    Source: Daily Kos
  • April 18, 2018
    Labor and civil rights organizations call for EPA chief Scott Pruitt's ouster

    In an advertisement running in three newspapers Wednesday, a coalition of labor and civil rights organizations joined green groups in calling for Pruitt "to resign, or be removed."

    Source: The Washington Post
  • April 18, 2018
    Nuclear War: Can Physicians Do Anything to Prevent It?

    Op-ed co-authored by PSR's Drs. Ira Helfand and Nitin S. Damle, who write, "After the Cold War, the medical community, like much of society, acted as though the danger of nuclear war had ended. Of course, the nuclear threat did not disappear."

    Source: Medscape

Press Clippings Archive »