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Heat Advisory: Protecting Health on a Warming Planet
by Dr. Alan Lockwood

Drawing on peer-reviewed scientific and medical research, Dr. Lockwood meticulously details the symptoms of climate change and their medical side effects.

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Fact Sheets

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Drinking Water and the Elderly

    Aging is associated with physiological, functional, and behavioral changes that can result in increased vulnerability to biological and chemical contaminants in drinking water. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Disinfection Byproducts

    Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) form when chlorine or other disinfectants react with organic material (from the decomposition of leaves and other vegetation) naturally found in drinking water sources. The use of chlorine to disinfect drinking water has been hailed as one of the major public health breakthroughs in the 20th century, resulting in a large decrease in mortality from waterborne infectious disease. However, in 1976 the National Cancer Institute published data showing that chloroform, a chlorination byproduct, caused cancer in rodents. There is now evidence that disinfection—though pivotal in fighting infectious disease—may also result in cancer and other health risks for humans. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Cryptosporidium

    Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) is a protozoan parasite known to infect humans and many animal species. The infective oocysts of Cryptosporidium are shed in the feces, and infection can occur by consumption of contaminated food or water, ingestion of contaminated recreational water, or through contact with feces of infected persons or animals. Cryptosporidium is not new, but is has gained recognition, both because it has become more widespread and because of evidence that there are potential life-threatening consequences of infection in the growing population of immunocompromised persons. Read more »

  • Coal-Fired Power Plants

    A fact sheet on the health impacts of coal-fired power plants. Read more »

  • Biomonitoring: A Public Perspective

    This article is the fourth in the series "From Research to Real Life" that GBPSR presents in conjunction with the Boston University Superfund Basic Research Program (BUSBRP). Read more »

  • Environmental Pollutants and the Immune System

    In evolution, surprisingly little is left to chance. Biologic systems, whether composed of millions of liver cells working in concert to detoxify the blood, or white blood cells attempting to defend against foreign microbe invasion, are "designed" with controls, regulators, checks, and balances. Read more »

  • Climate Change Flyer

    Please make use of this great resource explaining the basics of climate change: what it is, why its happening, and what we can do to stop it. This flyer is great to use at tabling events for the general public, and doubles as an attractive poster when unfolded. Read more »

  • Infographic: America's Gun Violence Epidemic

    This infographic created by the George Washington University Master of Public Health program looks at gun violence and mental health. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Cancer

    In the United States, cancer is the second leading cause of death, exceeded only by heart disease. According to recent National Cancer Institute statistics, the incidence of many cancers, including breast, testicular, urinary bladder, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, has increased in recent decades. As described in this document, some neoplastic diseases have been linked to drinking water contaminants. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Atrazine

    Atrazine is the most widely used pesticide in U.S. agriculture and is the predominant member of the triazine herbicide family. Although EPA restricts use to certified applicators, atrazine is used extensively in the Midwest, as well as in the Appalachian region, New England, and the Coastal Plains. Some 80 million pounds of atrazine are applied annually, primarily to corn, sorghum, and other crops. It is also registered for use on lawns and golf courses. Read more »

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