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Fact Sheets

Issue
 
  • Big Issues in Coal Ash Disposal

    The Environmental Protection Agency is currently receiving public comments on its proposed regulations for coal ash handling and disposal. PSR strongly supports the option called "Subtitle C," which would create uniform, federally enforcecable standards that would greatly strengthen protections for human health. Read more »

  • Coal Ash Fact Sheet Coal Ash: Hazardous to Human Health

    Coal ash is the waste that is left after coal is combusted (burned). It includes fly ash (fine powdery particles that are carried up the smoke stack and captured by pollution control devices) as well as coarser materials that fall to the bottom of the furnace. Most coal ash comes from coal-fired electric power plants. Read more »

  • Coal Ash Toxics: Damaging to Human Health

    The toxic substances found in coal ash can inflict grave damage to the human body and the environment. These substances have been shown to escape from some coal ash disposal sites, contaminating the air, land, surface waters, and/or underground aquifers that feed drinking water wells. Read more »

  • Regulating Coal Ash Fact Sheet Regulating Coal Ash: Choosing a Policy that will Protect Human Health

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is going to promulgate new rules for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, or coal ash. Currently the EPA is presenting two different options for how coal ash would be disposed, and is accepting citizen comments on them. PSR strongly urges its members to submit comments in support of “Subtitle C.” Read more »

  • Toxic Chemicals and Environmental Justice

    Toxic chemical exposures create specific burdens borne by communities-of-color, Indigenous peoples, and low income communities. These communities across the United States bear a disproportionate impact of a wide array of chemical exposures. Read more »

  • In Harm's Way Chemical Fact Sheet

    This chart shows the health effects and characteristics of exposures to the toxicants listed. Learning disabilities include dysfunctions in listening, speaking, reading, writing, spelling, or calculations. Read more »

  • Adverse Birth Outcomes and Environmental Health Threats

    Despite recent advances in medicine, the incidence of adverse birth outcomes appears to be rising across the United States. A growing body of literature contends that adverse birth outcomes are a result of harmful environmental exposures. Read more »

  • Birth Defects & Other Reproductive Disorders

    Every day, pregnant women are exposed to toxic substances that can be harmful to their babies. Potential effects include physical defects, learning disabilities, and other disorders. This pamphlet suggests some easy things you can do to protect your baby’s health. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Maternal and Child Health

    The interaction of unique physiologic, pharmacokinetic, and exposure factors for pregnant women, fetuses, infants, and children make these populations especially susceptible to certain waterborne contaminants. Read more »

  • The Need for Chemical Reform in the United States

    The U. S. chemicals management system is broken. It fails to protect human health from hazardous chemicals adequately because it lacks mandatory safety requirements before a chemical can gain access to market. Read more »

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