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Our nation's clean water policy should provide all communities with access to healthy, safe water by protecting the streams and wetlands that contribute to our drinking water supply.

Fact Sheets

Issue
 
  • Particulate Matter

    Fact sheet on health impacts of particulate matter. Read more »

  • Why PSR Opposes the Keystone XL Pipeline

    Oil combustion always involves some health and environmental costs. But tar sands oil is far worse than conventional oil. Read more »

  • Cancer and the Environment

    It is now believed that at least 60% of cancer deaths could be prevent through modification of personal behaviors, such as smoking cessation, dietary changes, and reducing sun exposure. Another significant cause of cancer is exposure to carcinogens in the environment--exposures that could be prevent by society, but over which the individual often has little control. Read more »

  • New PSR fact sheets on air pollutant effects

    PSR presents three new fact sheets, detailing the health effects of air pollutants on the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, and the nervous system. Read more »

  • Chromium Fact Sheet

    A brief overview of the dangers to health from hexavalent chromium in coal ash. Read more »

  • Radiation and Public Health: The Medical Consequences of Radiation

    A short introductory guide to the medical consequences of radiation for clinicians. Read more »

  • Big Issues in Coal Ash Disposal

    The Environmental Protection Agency is currently receiving public comments on its proposed regulations for coal ash handling and disposal. PSR strongly supports the option called "Subtitle C," which would create uniform, federally enforcecable standards that would greatly strengthen protections for human health. Read more »

  • Coal Ash Fact Sheet Coal Ash: Hazardous to Human Health

    Coal ash is the waste that is left after coal is combusted (burned). It includes fly ash (fine powdery particles that are carried up the smoke stack and captured by pollution control devices) as well as coarser materials that fall to the bottom of the furnace. Most coal ash comes from coal-fired electric power plants. Read more »

  • Coal Ash Toxics: Damaging to Human Health

    The toxic substances found in coal ash can inflict grave damage to the human body and the environment. These substances have been shown to escape from some coal ash disposal sites, contaminating the air, land, surface waters, and/or underground aquifers that feed drinking water wells. Read more »

  • Regulating Coal Ash Fact Sheet Regulating Coal Ash: Choosing a Policy that will Protect Human Health

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is going to promulgate new rules for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, or coal ash. Currently the EPA is presenting two different options for how coal ash would be disposed, and is accepting citizen comments on them. PSR strongly urges its members to submit comments in support of “Subtitle C.” Read more »

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