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Coal ash is toxic. Tell President Obama that protection from coal ash contamination has to be robust, mandatory and nationwide.

Fact Sheets

Issue
 
  • Regulating Coal Ash Fact Sheet Regulating Coal Ash: Choosing a Policy that will Protect Human Health

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is going to promulgate new rules for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, or coal ash. Currently the EPA is presenting two different options for how coal ash would be disposed, and is accepting citizen comments on them. PSR strongly urges its members to submit comments in support of “Subtitle C.” Read more »

  • Toxic Chemicals and Environmental Justice

    Toxic chemical exposures create specific burdens borne by communities-of-color, Indigenous peoples, and low income communities. These communities across the United States bear a disproportionate impact of a wide array of chemical exposures. Read more »

  • In Harm's Way Chemical Fact Sheet

    This chart shows the health effects and characteristics of exposures to the toxicants listed. Learning disabilities include dysfunctions in listening, speaking, reading, writing, spelling, or calculations. Read more »

  • Adverse Birth Outcomes and Environmental Health Threats

    Despite recent advances in medicine, the incidence of adverse birth outcomes appears to be rising across the United States. A growing body of literature contends that adverse birth outcomes are a result of harmful environmental exposures. Read more »

  • Birth Defects & Other Reproductive Disorders

    Every day, pregnant women are exposed to toxic substances that can be harmful to their babies. Potential effects include physical defects, learning disabilities, and other disorders. This pamphlet suggests some easy things you can do to protect your baby’s health. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Maternal and Child Health

    The interaction of unique physiologic, pharmacokinetic, and exposure factors for pregnant women, fetuses, infants, and children make these populations especially susceptible to certain waterborne contaminants. Read more »

  • The Need for Chemical Reform in the United States

    The U. S. chemicals management system is broken. It fails to protect human health from hazardous chemicals adequately because it lacks mandatory safety requirements before a chemical can gain access to market. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Radon

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas formed by uranium and radium in rocks and soil. Groundwater dissolves radon from uranium-containing rock, resulting in generally higher concentrations of radon in well water compared with drinking water derived from surface waters, such as rivers and lakes. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Nitrate

    The term nitrate refers to a large family of nitrogen-containing organic and inorganic compounds. Each year, 12 million tons of nitrogen are applied as commercial fertilizers, and some 150,000 tons of nitrate compounds are released into the environment by industrial facilities. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Lead

    For most Americans, lead exposure has been significantly reduced in recent decades through bans on leaded gasoline and lead-based paint. However, lead remains a serious public health threat for developing fetuses, infants, and children, who are particularly sensitive to its toxic effects. Read more »

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