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Guided by the values and expertise of medicine and public health, Physicians for Social Responsibility works to protect humanity from the gravest threats to health and survival. Right now, you can make a difference by registering your comments on the EPA's new Clean Power rule to limit carbon from existing coal-burning power plants. Just click the button to get started.

Resources & Publications

Informed activism is principled and effective activism. PSR aims to provide the best materials for its network of members and activists to work at the grassroots level against nuclear weapons, global warming, and environmental contamination. Select an Issue or Resource Type to search for up-to-date information to help you take action in your community.

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  • Big Issues in Coal Ash Disposal

    The Environmental Protection Agency is currently receiving public comments on its proposed regulations for coal ash handling and disposal. PSR strongly supports the option called "Subtitle C," which would create uniform, federally enforcecable standards that would greatly strengthen protections for human health. Read more »

  • Coal Ash Fact Sheet Coal Ash: Hazardous to Human Health

    Coal ash is the waste that is left after coal is combusted (burned). It includes fly ash (fine powdery particles that are carried up the smoke stack and captured by pollution control devices) as well as coarser materials that fall to the bottom of the furnace. Most coal ash comes from coal-fired electric power plants. Read more »

  • Coal Ash Toxics: Damaging to Human Health

    The toxic substances found in coal ash can inflict grave damage to the human body and the environment. These substances have been shown to escape from some coal ash disposal sites, contaminating the air, land, surface waters, and/or underground aquifers that feed drinking water wells. Read more »

  • Environmental Threats to Healthy Aging Report and Training Materials Download

    Healthy Aging is really about healthy living. This new report offers the most comprehensive review of the currently available research on the lifetime influences of environmental factors on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and their relation to a range of other chronic diseases. Read more »

  • Toxic Chemicals and Environmental Justice

    Toxic chemical exposures create specific burdens borne by communities-of-color, Indigenous peoples, and low income communities. These communities across the United States bear a disproportionate impact of a wide array of chemical exposures. Read more »

  • In Harm's Way Materials Download

    A 140 page, fully referenced, peer reviewed report, addressing the links between toxic chemicals in our environment and learning, behavioral and developmental disabilities in children. Read more »

  • In Harm's Way Chemical Fact Sheet

    This chart shows the health effects and characteristics of exposures to the toxicants listed. Learning disabilities include dysfunctions in listening, speaking, reading, writing, spelling, or calculations. Read more »

  • In Harm's Way: Toxic Threats to Child Development Project

    Learning, behavioral and developmental disabilities prevent our children from reaching their full human potential. Seventeen percent of children in the United States have been diagnosed with one or more developmental disabilities. Read more »

  • Birth Defects & Other Reproductive Disorders

    Every day, pregnant women are exposed to toxic substances that can be harmful to their babies. Potential effects include physical defects, learning disabilities, and other disorders. This pamphlet suggests some easy things you can do to protect your baby’s health. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Maternal and Child Health

    The interaction of unique physiologic, pharmacokinetic, and exposure factors for pregnant women, fetuses, infants, and children make these populations especially susceptible to certain waterborne contaminants. Read more »

 

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