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Resources & Publications

Informed activism is principled and effective activism. PSR aims to provide the best materials for its network of members and activists to work at the grassroots level against nuclear weapons, global warming, and environmental contamination. Select an Issue or Resource Type to search for up-to-date information to help you take action in your community.

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  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Cancer

    In the United States, cancer is the second leading cause of death, exceeded only by heart disease. According to recent National Cancer Institute statistics, the incidence of many cancers, including breast, testicular, urinary bladder, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, has increased in recent decades. As described in this document, some neoplastic diseases have been linked to drinking water contaminants. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Atrazine

    Atrazine is the most widely used pesticide in U.S. agriculture and is the predominant member of the triazine herbicide family. Although EPA restricts use to certified applicators, atrazine is used extensively in the Midwest, as well as in the Appalachian region, New England, and the Coastal Plains. Some 80 million pounds of atrazine are applied annually, primarily to corn, sorghum, and other crops. It is also registered for use on lawns and golf courses. Read more »

  • Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Arsenic

    Arsenic is a poisonous heavy metal, and exposure to it can occur through inhalation, dermal contact and ingestion. Most exposure, however, occurs through consumption of arsenic-contaminated food and water. Contamination of drinking water supplies with arsenic can occur by runoff of arsenical pesticides, dissolution of natural mineral deposits, atmospheric deposition, industrial releases, or improperly disposed chemicals. Read more »

  • Drinking Water and Disease

    What health care providers should know. Read more »

  • Status Syndrome: A Challenge to Medicine

    The poor have poor health. At first blush that is neither new nor surprising. Perhaps it should be more surprising than it is. In rich countries, such as the United States, the nature of poverty has changed—people do not die from lack of clean water and sanitary facilities or from famine—and yet, persistently, those at the bottom of the socioeconomic scale have worse health than those above them in the hierarchy. Read more »

  • California Senate Joint Resolution on Torture

    Senate Joint Resolution 19 condemns the practice of torture and requests health professionals to report abusive interrogation tactics. Read more »

  • California Senate Committee Hearing on Medical Participation in Torture

    Statement by Jose Quiroga, M.D. before the California Senate Business Professions and Economic Development Committee, January 14, 2008. Read more »

  • Social Justice as a PSR Issue Over the Past Half-Century

    The PSR Social Justice Committee has been meeting over the past year to develop PSR programs in the areas of social justice. Read more »

  • Outline of Domestic Violence Response Initiative

    PSR Maine and Maine Primary Care Association's program on domestic violence. Read more »

  • The Topography of Poverty in the United States

    This paper describes a spatial analysis of poverty in the United States at the county level for 2000. Read more »

 

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