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Reports

Issue
 
  • Healthy Living Resources

    The list of organizations in the Healthy Living Resources guide is not exhaustive, but we hope it will provide some starting points for you. Read more »

  • Confronting Nuclear War

    Nearly twenty years after the Cold War has ended, humankind is still faced with the genuine risk of instant extinction without representation. Even worse, this possibility could occur by accident, as a single computer miscalculation or mechanical error could lead to a civilization-ending nuclear war. The 9/11 attacks killed some 3,000 people causing enormous destruction, chaos, and grief. In comparison, a purposeful or accidental nuclear war between the U.S. and Russia would unquestionably kill tens of millions in the short-term, and untold millions in the long-term. Therefore, the threat of nuclear war is the most serious potential health, environmental, agricultural, educational and moral problem facing the human race. Read more »

  • Economic Consequences of a Radiological or Nuclear Attack

    Property destruction, loss of life, and injuries sustained from a nuclear or radiological attack have significant economic consequences. The loss of productive assets can extend for long periods and generate significant economic loss. Economic impacts caused by an event need to be addressed in sequential order beginning with the detonation, atmospheric dispersion, and deposition of the fallout from the weapon. Report by Pacific National Northwest Laboratory. Read more »

  • Status Syndrome: A Challenge to Medicine

    The poor have poor health. At first blush that is neither new nor surprising. Perhaps it should be more surprising than it is. In rich countries, such as the United States, the nature of poverty has changed—people do not die from lack of clean water and sanitary facilities or from famine—and yet, persistently, those at the bottom of the socioeconomic scale have worse health than those above them in the hierarchy. Read more »

  • Social Justice as a PSR Issue Over the Past Half-Century

    The PSR Social Justice Committee has been meeting over the past year to develop PSR programs in the areas of social justice. Read more »

  • The Topography of Poverty in the United States

    This paper describes a spatial analysis of poverty in the United States at the county level for 2000. Read more »

  • Income Inequality Hits Record Levels, New CBO Data Show

    Real after-tax incomes jumped by an average of nearly $180,000 for the top 1 percent of households in 2005, while rising just $400 for middle-income households and $200 for lowerincome households, according to new data from the Congressional Budget Office. Read more »

  • Culture and Medicine

    When asked about globalization, Margaret Thatcher, the former Prime Minister of Great Britain, replied, “There is no alternative.” Her reply was shortened to “TINA,” which some people think is a newly discovered law of nature. Yet, public resistance to this new corporatecentered trade is increasing. What relevance does this have to American physicians? Does globalization affect health? Read more »

  • Outreach on Toxic Threats in Massachusetts

    Thanks to a grant from the Massachusetts Environmental Trust's new Human Health and Environment Program, GBPSR conducted Massachusetts-specific work related to In Harm's Way: Toxic Threats to Child Development (IHW). Read more »

  • Environmental Chemicals and Estrogens

    In the 1980’s, an unusually high incidence of cancers was observed in the upper Cape Cod region of Massachusetts. Possible environmental risk factors were identified including proximity to the Massachusetts Military Reservation Read more »

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