All Categories


Found 13 Results

Letter to EPA on Coal Combustion Residuals

Issue: air pollution | coal | environment & health | federal government

Type: letter to policymaker

Letter signed by PSR and partner groups asking the Environmental Protection Agency to extend by 30 days the comment period for the Interim Final Guidance for State Coal Combustion Residuals Permit Programs.


PSR Expert Testimony on Coal Ash

Issue: coal | environment & health | toxic chemicals

Type: testimony

Chesapeake PSR is suing the EPA over a proposed delay in a rule that slashes coal ash waste discharges into rivers and streams. PSR National Environment & Health Director Barbara Gottlieb gave expert testimony on the health impacts of coal ash disposal.


PSR Policy on Carbon Pricing

Issue: air pollution | children's health | climate change | coal | environment & health | environmental justice | renewable energy

Type: policy statement

PSR recommends a Price on Carbon applied to Fossil Fuels as a Tool to Help Prevent Global Climate Catastrophe Statement: Physicians for Social Responsibility urges the United States to adopt a carbon price on fossil fuels to control global emissions of carbon dioxide and methane, the chief causes of global climate change. Background: The Intergovernmental …

Read More


Heat Advisory: Protecting Health on a Warming Planet

Issue: air pollution | climate change | coal | environment & health

Type: book review

Dr. Alan Lockwood, PSR senior scientist on coal and climate change, has written a new book, Heat Advisory: Protecting Health on a Warming Planet, published by MIT Press. Drawing on peer-reviewed scientific and medical research, Dr. Lockwood meticulously details the symptoms of climate change and their medical side effects. He also calls for “preventive medicine,” explaining …

Read More


Selling Our Health Down the River

Issue: coal | environment & health | federal government | safe food & water | toxic chemicals

Type: report

Why EPA Needs to Finalize the Strongest Rule to Stop Water Pollution from Power Plants The Environmental Protection Agency recently set the first federal limits on how much arsenic, mercury, selenium, nitrogen and other toxic metals coal-fired power plants can discharge into streams and rivers. PSR coauthored this report in June 2015 documenting the need …

Read More


The Silent Epidemic: Coal and the Hidden Threat to Health

Issue: coal | environment & health

Type: book review

About the Book: In The Silent Epidemic, Alan Lockwood, a physician, describes and documents the impacts of the coal fuel cycle on human health. Lockwood’s comprehensive treatment examines every aspect of coal, from its complex chemical makeup to details of mining, transporting, burning, and disposal—each of which generates significant health concerns. He explains the impact …

Read More


Chromium Fact Sheet

Issue: coal | environment & health | toxic chemicals

Type: fact sheet

A brief overview of the dangers to health from hexavalent chromium in coal ash.


Big Issues in Coal Ash Disposal

Issue: coal | environment & health

Type: fact sheet

The Environmental Protection Agency is currently receiving public comments on its proposed regulations for coal ash handling and disposal. PSR strongly supports the option called “Subtitle C,” which would create uniform, federally enforceable standards that would greatly strengthen protections for human health.


Coal Ash: The Toxic Threat to Our Health and Environment

Issue: coal | environment & health | toxic chemicals

Type: report

Coal ash, one of the dirtiest secrets in American energy production, burst into the U.S. consciousness three days before Christmas, 2008 when an earthen wall holding back a huge coal ash disposal pond failed at the coal-fired power plant in Kingston, Tennessee. The 40-acre pond spilled more than 1 billion gallons of coal ash slurry …

Read More


Coal Ash Toxics: Damaging to Human Health

Issue: coal | environment & health | toxic chemicals

Type: fact sheet

The toxic substances found in coal ash can inflict grave damage to the human body and the environment. These substances have been shown to escape from some coal ash disposal sites, contaminating the air, land, surface waters, and/or underground aquifers that feed drinking water wells.